Tag Archives: being human

Programme Name: Being Human - TX: 26/02/2012 - Episode: n/a (No. 4) - Embargoed for publication until: 21/02/2012 - Picture Shows:  Annie (Lenora Crichlow), Kirby (JAMES LANCE) - (C) Touchpaper - Photographer: Huw John

Being Human: A Spectre Calls Preview

This week’s episode of Being Human is “A Spectre Calls”, in which the arrival of a new ghost at the house raises suspicions from Annie and her new friends.

As this week’s gallery (courtesy of the BBC) is rather modest, we’ll start with that.

So, what’s happening this week?

Annie, Hal and Tom are like a ring of steel protecting baby Eve – so when Kirby, a ghost from the 1970s calls at the house, they’re immediately suspicious.

Kirby wins them over with his feckless personality and proof that he’s been sent by Nina to help look after the baby. Annie soon falls for the handsome, charismatic ghost – perhaps Nina also sent him for reasons other than the baby?

Tom is utterly charmed by him, too, pleased to have an alpha male about the house to teach him the way of the world. Hal has his doubts about Kirby, but then Kirby has his doubts about Hal. Who will be proved right?

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie with her new regular cast of Michael Socha as Tom and Damien Molony as Hal. Also appearing are Gina Bramhill as Woman, Andrew Gower as Cutler, James Lance as Kirby, Ceri Mears as Custody Sergeant, Lucy Robinson as Dr. Wilson and Angus Wright as Dr. North.

“A Spectre Calls” is by Tom Grieves. You can catch new episodes of Being Human every on Sunday at 9pm on BBC Three, and catch previous episodes on BBC iPlayer.

The Graveyard Shift Review


Ever wondered whether Vampires have Ghosts? We’ve seen in those final moments the victims of vampiric blood lust being shuffled towards an unassuming door but what about the pointy teethed ones themselves?

Is the transformation so horrific that the human is completely purged away? Or are their human spirits forced to watch their former packaging tearing the throat out of a sad sack bus driver? What kind of moral compass could you be to yourself in that situation? Could your human soul save you now there’s nothing human left to empathize with?

Up until now, in the case of Hal – the hermetically sealed vampire replacement for the departed Mitchell – its been difficult to pinpoint what kind of human he once was.

His manner points to a character older than the 1955 garb but up until tonight’s Hal centric episode The Graveyard Shift he’s been little more than a convenient plot device – like Mitchell he seems to be admired for his appetite in humans but unlike him, there’s been a subtle shift in what he, and Being Human is about – its no longer humans coping with being monsters, its monsters struggling to be human.

Forced to work together Tom and Hal’s hesitant, testing relationship is an absolute joy – coming from two very different backgrounds; a regal, haughty old world gentleman forced to deal with the living hell that is the service industry and a practical, no nonsense, raised in a van, street kid who occasionally backs up this philosophy with the odd stake to the heart – its great to see the little connections between the two form as ultimately Hal decides who’s side he’ll take.

Their entire friendship is based on mutual distrust and most of the comedy comes from neither one of them willing to concede anything. After Hal double crosses and then stakes Fergus, you get the feeling that Hal has earned the right to sit down for a cup of tea in front of the Antiques Roadshow with Tom.

Its not quite the same dynamic – and, yes the episode was a pretty shameless trip through all the traits that make Being Human what it is (the wit, the clash of styles, the brilliant guest stars) but its one that’s slowly becoming more intriguing.

Caught in the middle of all this alpha male bonding is Michaela, an over the top parody of ‘deep and meaningful’ Emo types who unwittingly but ultimately utterly willing entrant into the supernatural world – Laura Patch easily fits into that category of great Being Human guest spots and her eventual salvation hopefully leaves the door open for her character to return.

Annie however seems to be taking her ‘we shall not be moved’ stances as a sign to take leave of her common sense. Twice she takes baby Eve out in a public place even after she had been warned by the sadly departed Fergus about doing just that.

Fergus’s warning forces Annie to doubt her choice to stay which thankfully gives us a little more time with the excellent Mark Williams playing the Vampire Recorder, Regus, who in a delightfully sleazy scene gets to relive Annie’s first time, albeit from Annie’s point of view.

Regus’ reasoning for betraying his kind doesn’t really make sense but if it gets Williams a little more screen time then its a fair compromise. Despite the occasional misstep, so far this season has written out three of its stars, introduced the end of Vampires as a race and, now with tonight’s episode, seamlessly ushered in a brand new, completely involving line up.

In terms of the overall series arc The House of the Vampires are down another leader perhaps paving the way for Cutler and his focus group lead outing of the werewolves to usher in the war on mankind.

With the monster temporarily united under one roof and the series back on more assured ground here’s hoping it can maintain the momentum of this episode.

Programme Name: Being Human - TX: 19/02/2012 - Episode: n/a (No. 3) - Embargoed for publication until: 14/02/2012 - Picture Shows:  Tom (Michael Socha), Michaela (Laura Patch), Hal (Damien Molony) - (C) Touchpaper - Photographer: Huw John

Being Human: The Graveyard Shift Preview

There seems to be a few mixed opinions about the current run of Being Human but the series continues regardless this Sunday evening with “The Graveyard Shift”.

Featuring alongside Lenora Crichlow (Annie), Michael Socha (Tom) and Damien Molony (Hal) are Anthony Flanagan as Fergus, Caryl Morgan as the shop assistant, Laura Patch as Michaela and Mark Williams as Regus.

Hal is unaccustomed to modern life, having kept himself sheltered from society to avoid the risk of killing. So when Annie and Tom tell him he needs to get a job, he is filled with dread.

Faced with the horror of working in the café with Tom, Hal is tempted by vampire Fergus to come back to the vampire fold as their new leader. Meanwhile Annie is convinced by Regus that the baby should be taken away to safety, or the vampires will surely kill their ‘destroyer’. But when Fergus and his gang attack the house, Annie needs to prove that with Tom and Hal that they are a strong enough team to protect the baby… but are they?

Ready for a gallery?

“The Graveyard Shift” airs at 9 pm (so a bit earlier than any real graveyard shift!) on BBC Three on Sunday, February 19th and is also being simulcast on the award-winning BBC HD channel – the BBC’s High Definition channel available through Freesat channel 109, Freeview channel 54, Sky channel 169 and Virgin Media channel 187.

Being Human 1955 Review

Some genre television can end up being described with the term ‘Monster of the week’ as each week sees a new and interesting monster for the characters to battle. Usually this occurs early in the first series, before they have time to kick off any decent arc plot.

This series of Being Human risks being labelled ‘Comedy Ritual of the week’ after yet another piece of theater where characters with no knowledge of the occult other than a few minutes on Wikipedia try to channel ‘mystic forces’. With Mark William’s stellar performance in episode one still fresh in our minds, Leonora Critchlow’s bizarre recitation of pidgin Latin as the apex of her ritual to channel the power of ‘The Chosen One’ is another performance worth watching. I am wondering if there will be another ritual in the next episode and part of me is secretly hoping there will be.

Compared to episode one, Being Human 1955 appears to be a whole different kettle of fish, or pack of wolves or whatever. This feels more like an ‘episode one’, with none of the climatic battles or solid resolutions that made last week’s seem very much like an end of season finale. Here the plot is more around the interactions of the characters, in particular the integration of Hal, Pearl and Leo – the three supernaturals we were introduced to in episode one – with the existing characters. Cue lots of ego clashes and personal drama as the old vampire-werewolf antagonisms come to the fore and two houseproud ghosts almost come to blows over what brand of tea should be drunk.

There are hints of a sinister danger in the form of new vampire, Hal, trying (and almost failing) to control his blood lust and a lot of odd couple weirdness which almost, but not quite, edges us closer to the early days of the Mitchell/George/Annie dynamic of earlier series. It remains to be seen if this new line up manages to endear itself to the audience in the same way as those three did.

This episode’s writer, Lisa Mcgee, seems to share the same concerns I expressed in my last review about the convenience of there being another threesome of supernaturals living together. She certainly felt the need to justify it with a wonderful exchange between Annie and Pearl where it is shown that they were both convinced that the set up was unique and unusual. Good to see a writer in touch with the fan base enough to anticipate potential complaints and handle them in such a comedic and typical ‘Being Human’ manner.

Overall this is a very low key episode with a lot of focus on character development and the establishment of a new dynamic within the line up rather than the arc plot. The arc plot itself does rear its head in parts but only as small hints – most notably as a ghostly image on a television screen. This is a welcome rest from the chaos and confusion and multiple deaths of the previous episode. A time for the characters to relax and unwind and be themselves. Hopefully, over the next few weeks, the new line up will have plenty of chances to grow on the audience and gain as large a following as their predecessors.

If I have any reservations about this episode they come from the fact that Cutler, my current favourite, only gets a brief few moments of screen time. However, this is time well used in a delightfully amusing ‘focus group’ parody that does not end well for the focus group. The indications are that Cutler will be a very important character in this series, so I look forward to seeing more of him.

*‘Seize the Day. I came, I saw, I conquered’ (Carpe Diem. Veni Vidi Vici) being more or less what she did say. As far as I can tell with my own, equally dodgy knowledge of pidgin Latin… feel free to correct me if you think me wrong.

 

being human eve of the war series four screenshot 3

Being Human: Eve of the War Review

The end of series three of BBC Three’s Being Human left a lot for series four to live up to. Along with the controversial (well, many fans were unhappy about it) death of charming Irish Vampire, Mitchell (Aidan Turner), at the hands of his best friend George (Russell Tovey) it also saw things being set up for what promised to be an apocalyptic plot line with the pending arrival of ‘The Old Ones’, the most ancient vampires, and George, Nina and Annie’s promise to fight them no matter what the cost.

As series 4 opens, it seems as if the cost for fighting is too high. We return to the decrepit guesthouse in Barry that our heroes made their home in the last series to find that things are far from well. Werewolf Nina has been killed, ambushed by vampires soon after giving birth to her daughter and George (Russell Tovey) is going insane with grief and paranoia. Resident ghost, Annie (Lenora Crichlow), is doing what she can to keep him sane but her characteristically enthusiastic attempts are not achieving much.

Meanwhile, Griffin, the first Old One to arrive in Britain and seen so dramatically at the end of series three, is confident of an easy victory and has plans to kidnap the child in order to present her as a gift to the other Old Ones. George, Annie and Tom McNair, another Werewolf who featured in the previous series, set out to prevent this from happening.

The above is the central plot for this episode, the main driving narrative that takes the viewer through to the quite shocking end. However, there is more to this episode that that relatively simple thread. We have flash forwards to 2037 where we see George and Nina’s daughter, now a grown woman, as leader of a beleaguered resistance force fighting the vampires who have now taken complete control.

We are also introduced to three new characters, supernaturals like our heroes who have also taken to living together in a shared house. Vampire Hal (Damien Malony), old Werewolf Leo (Louis Mahoney) and ghost Pearl (Tamla Kari) have what appears to be a similar dynamic to the one seen in earlier series with Mitchell, George and Annie and are obviously set to play prominent parts in future episodes.

Expectations for this episode were high and there is a lot of good stuff in here to fulfil that expectation. Toby Whitehouse has yet again shown that he is not afraid to mess around with a format and give the viewers a surprise or two – the death of major characters being one of them.

The vampire protagonists are suitably sinister and organized while still maintaining individual characters. One in particular, Cutler (Andrew Gover), is a real treat with his sarcasm (best line of the episode: ‘Before you reach the first major city, they will have raised an army. On Twitter’) and it is to be hoped that he will appear more in future episodes.

There was also a star turn by Mark Williams as an insane Vampire archivist who should also make a return. However, there were a number of issues. For one, the way that the lives of Hal, Pearl and Leo mirror those of Mitchell, George and Annie seems a little too pat.

Though it is apparently written into the metaphysics of the universe that this is a stable arrangement (the ancient Vampire prophesies which are clearly important to this series make that statement) it has also been stated in previous episodes that Mitchell, George and Annie were unique. I am not sure it is a good idea to remove that uniqueness.

I am also a little upset at Nina’s death.

Not only was she one of my personal favorite characters and a good example of a strong female character, I dislike the fact that her death took place ‘off screen’. She deserved a better end than that. There are also likely to be the inevitable Terminator jokes about the future scenes – the vampire ruled dystopia and the way the humans deal with it is very reminiscent of a certain dystopia ruled by Skynet. There is a risk here of some overused clichés being trotted out. Alternatively, said expected clichés may well be subverted.

Time will tell if these relatively minor flaws will be significant in the rest of the series or if the excellent writing and characterization will outweigh them. Time will also tell if the series format can afford to lose not just one but three of the major characters who made the previous series so entertaining. Early indications from Twitter and Facebook are that these were not popular deaths. I certainly look forward to seeing how things turn out.

Programme Name: Being Human - TX: 05/02/2012 - Episode: n/a (No. 1) - Embargoed for publication until: 31/01/2012 - Picture Shows:  Annie (Lenora Crichlow) - (C) Touchpaper - Photographer: Huw John

Being Human Eve of the War Gallery

The fourth series of Being Human is just hours away, and with so much going on the BBC have kindly provided several images for us to share!

As you’ll know, the series makes it’s long-awaited return to BBC Three on Sunday evening at 9pm with the episode Eve of the War and you can get a sneak peak below…

Starring Lenora Crichlow, Michael Socha and Damien Molony the show was created by Toby Whithouse who also writes this first episode. Viewers in the USA can catch the new series on BBC America from February 25th.

Being Human: Series Four Updates

Here are a couple of tid bits about the fast approaching fourth series of Being Human.

First off is a new clip from Sunday’s series opener, Eve of the War:

You can see even more Being Human series four trailers and clips here and here.

Also, a synopsis has been released for the third episode of the series, The Graveyard Shift which will air on the 19th of February:

Hal is unaccustomed to modern life, having kept himself sheltered from society to avoid the risk of killing. So when Annie and Tom tell him he needs to get a job, he is filled with dread.

Faced with the horror of working in the café with Tom, Hal is tempted by vampire Fergus to come back to the vampire fold as their new leader. Meanwhile Annie is convinced by Regus that the baby should be taken away to safety, or the vampires will surely kill their ‘destroyer’. But when Fergus and his gang attack the house, Annie needs to prove that with Tom and Hal that they are a strong enough team to protect the baby… but are they?

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie; Michael Socha as Tom; Damien Molony as Hal; Anthony Flanagan as Fergus; Caryl Morgan as the shop assistant; Laura Patch as Michaela and Mark Williams as Regus.

Being Human returns this Sunday at 9PM on BBC Three with Eve of the War.

Being Human: Start Date and Episode Guide

Well, for all those waiting for the fourth series of Being Human to start you can stop howling, because the start date for series four has been revealed to be the 5th of February at 9PM on BBC Three.

More then that there are details about the plots of the first two stories of the new series, as well the episode titles for the other six installments:

1. Eve Of The War

Airing 5 February on BBC3

Written by Toby Whithouse

In an old B&B in a sleepy seaside town, we join Annie, her housemate George and their new friend. They’re reeling from the loss of their best friend Mitchell, Tom’s father-figure McNair and the tragic departure of George’s girlfriend, Nina. But with a newborn baby to look after, it’s never been more difficult to live life under-the-radar as a ghost and two werewolves. There are also the vampires to deal with: lurking in every corner of society, waiting for the Old Ones to arrive and take over the world with brutal force. Can they fight them off? And at what cost? One thing becomes clear – the vampires believe that the child of two werewolves is important in their own mythology. Can this little baby really be the saviour of humanity? And what exactly are Cutler’s ‘alternative’ plans for world domination?

2. Being Human 1955

Airing 12 February on BBC3

Written by Lisa McGee

Hal, Leo and Pearl – another werewolf, vampire and ghost – turn up at the house. Leo is dying and this supernatural triumvirate believe the secret to saving the old werewolf’s life resides in Honolulu Heights. While Annie is confident that she can channel the power to help him, Tom isn’t so sure. Nor is he best pleased at having the disdainful and arrogant vampire Hal in his home either. But to fulfil Leo’s dying wish, the two are forced on a mission together. A fracas with a pawn shop owner bonds them temporarily, but later when Tom discovers Hal standing over baby Eve’s crib, Hal’s ultimate motives are called into question.

3. The Graveyard Shift

Airing 19 February on BBC3

Written by Jamie Mathieson

Hal is unaccustomed to modern life, having kept himself sheltered from society to avoid the risk of killing. So when Annie and Tom tell him he needs to get a job, he is filled with dread.

Faced with the horror of working in the café with Tom, Hal is tempted by vampire Fergus to come back to the vampire fold as their new leader. Meanwhile Annie is convinced by Regus that the baby should be taken away to safety, or the vampires will surely kill their ‘destroyer’. But when Fergus and his gang attack the house, Annie needs to prove that with Tom and Hal that they are a strong enough team to protect the baby… but are they?

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie; Michael Socha as Tom; Damien Molony as Hal; Anthony Flanagan as Fergus; Caryl Morgan as the shop assistant; Laura Patch as Michaela and Mark Williams as Regus.

4. A Spectre Calls

Airing 26 February on BBC3

Written by Tom Grieves

Annie, Hal and Tom are like a ring of steel protecting baby Eve – so when Kirby, a ghost from the 1970s calls at the house, they’re immediately suspicious.

Kirby wins them over with his feckless personality and proof that he’s been sent by Nina to help look after the baby. Annie soon falls for the handsome, charismatic ghost – perhaps Nina also sent him for reasons other than the baby?

Tom is utterly charmed by him, too, pleased to have an alpha male about the house to teach him the way of the world. Hal has his doubts about Kirby, but then Kirby has his doubts about Hal. Who will be proved right?

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie, Michael Socha as Tom, Damien Molony as Hal, Gina Bramhill as Woman, Andrew Gower as Cutler, James Lance as Kirby, Ceri Mears as Custody Sergeant, Lucy Robinson as Dr. Wilson and Angus Wright as Dr. North.

5. Hold The Front Page

Airing 4 March on BBC3

Written by Tom Grieves

Episode Five sees the return of Series Three’s and Becoming Human’s teenage vampire Adam.

Adam is madly in love with no-nonsense head teacher Yvonne, much to the dismay of our heroes. They’re on the run from the press, who see the relationship as a scandal.

Since vampires can’t be pictured on camera, the housemates are concerned about Adam getting photographed. They force him to confess his – and their – true nature to Yvonne. It’s a lot to take in, but there are bigger surprises in store when Yvonne discovers the reason that she’s able to see Annie, as well as what this means for her love affair with Adam.

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie, Michael Socha as Tom, Damien Molony as Hal, Ella Ainsworth as Henrietta, Sacha Dhawan as Pete, Andrew Gower as Cutler, Selina Griffiths as Yvonne and Craig Roberts as Adam.

6. Puppy Love

Airing 11 March on BBC3

Written by John Jackson

Romance is in the air for Tom when Allison, a geeky teen werewolf, turns up looking for help. Somebody seems intent on revealing werewolves to the world and she wants to get to the bottom of the matter.

In a bid to impress Allison, Tom leads her to the web savvy vampire, Cutler. Cutler is delighted to see more werewolves on the scene and soon finds use for his new friends. Tom also cajoles Hal into a double date with himself, Allison and attractive café patron, Alex. Hal insists that he’s stayed away from women for the past fifty years for a reason – but will his desire really spark his bloodlust once again?

Meanwhile Annie feels responsible for grouchy neighbour Emrys’ death and it’s up to her to complete his ghost’s unfinished business on earth – as soon as she can find out what it could be.

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie, Michael Socha as Tom, Damien Molony as Hal, Amanda Abbington as Golda, Kate Bracken as Alex, Gina Bramhill as Woman, Andrew Gower as Cutler, Marshall Griffin as Kane, Ellie Kendrick as Allison and Anthony O’Donnell as Emrys.

7. Making History

Airing 18 March on BBC3

Written by Toby Whithouse

He’s got big plans for Tom – together they’re going to be history makers.

Hal’s wicked past catches up with him and he finds himself led down a path of temptation. Having succumbed to drinking blood, Hal’s second date with Alex doesn’t exactly go to plan.

Meanwhile, Annie is called to Purgatory by the mysterious woman from the future. She’s got big news for Annie – there’s only one way to save the earth from imminent destruction by the vampires. But will Annie even contemplate the task that she’s given?

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie, Michael Socha as Tom, Damien Molony as Hal, Kate Bracken as Alex, Gina Bramhill as Woman, Natalie Burt as Rachel Cutler and Andrew Gower as Cutler.

8. The War Child (Finale)

Airing 25 March on BBC3

Written by Toby Whithouse

The Old Ones have arrived and are intent on taking over the world by force.

Cutler has other plans, but when they go awry he plots revenge on his own kind.

Annie is upset as she realises she has been tasked with making the most difficult decision in order to save the world. Tom and Hal have their own plan to destroy the vampires, but when vampire leader Mr. Snow visits Hal, he demonstrates the power he holds over our hero.

Starring Lenora Crichlow as Annie, Michael Socha as Tom, Damien Molony as Hal, Matthew Ashforde as Daniels, Kate Bracken as Alex, Gina Bramhill as Eve, Mark Gatiss as Mr. Snow, Andrew Gower as Cutler, Fred Pearson as Archivist, Steven Robertson as Mr. Rook and Michael Wildman as Milo.

More Being Human Series Four Trailers

As we inch closer and closer to returning to Barry Island for the fourth season of Being Human, more and more promotional material is released.

This time it is three short trailers highlighting three of the main characters in series four, namely Tom (Michael Socha), Annie (Lenora Crichlow) and Hal (Damien Molony).

Tom:

Annie:

Hal:

 

Being Human Series Four Trailer!

The first Being Human trailer for series four  has just arrived and it looks to be an exciting ride if the trailer is anything to go by:

“Annie, George, Tom and newcomer Hal find the fate of humanity in their hands as Being Human returns for it’s fourth series.”

Being Human series four will return to BBC Three a little later this year.